Which obelisks are suitable for climbing roses

Posted in Category Organic Gardening | by Harrod Horticultural | Comments (1)

We are great obelisk gardeners and have a number of competitor obelisks going strong, some a bit flaky by now. However when you introduced your obelisks we had two and then two more as they are far superior to the competitor ones and are sturdier and easier to erect ! We have David Austin hybrid roses trained up them and they are now in flower.

Roses Blog 1

Roses Blog 2



    Two views of 'Scepter'd Isle' rose on the patio that spent a

    lot of its time with its face on the ground until we gave it

    this support and we are thrilled by the display this year.





Roses Blog 3Roses Blog 4   



    Two views of 'Strawberry Hill' rose against a wall in the

    front garden .  





 Roses Blog 5 Roses Blog 6


    Two views of 'The Pilgrim' rose in an island bed in the

    front garden. Again it flopped around, finished up in

    the yew tree etc until I gave it an obelisk last year.

    What a reward!




Roses Blog 7 




    A view of 'Buttercup' rose against the back fence on a raised bed in the back garden.





Roses Blog 9

Roses Blog 8    Two views of 'Gentle Hermione' rose before and

    after! The obelisk arrived on the 26th June. On

    the 27th June I erected the obelisk, put it in 

    place, pruned the rose very heavily to finish up

    with stems that I could tie in to the obelisk.

    There is therefore much less flower than in the

                                                     first photo but next year it will look much more

                                                     like Scepter'd Isle or The Pilgrim.



Roses Blog 11   Roses Blog 10  Harrod Obelisks supporting two different 'Lichfield

    Angel' roses from David Austin. This a very

    beautiful and vigorous rose, that outgrows its

    ability to support its own growth. The first one is

    five years old and is sited in the woodland walk,

    where it is competing for light and very tall, but

    falling all over the place! The second one, three

    years old, has outgrown a small flimsy obelisk and

    is now much more secure on its new obelisk. I have

    given it clematis 'Niobe' as a companion - you can

                                                                                                just see a flower or two at the bottom, but it will

                                                                                                of course grow up and mix in with the rose in

                                                                                                due course.


    Many thanks to Mr Theobald, Nottinghamshire for this case study. 


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By Linda McKernan15th July 2015


I also use obelisks in the garden but mine are used for growing sweet potatoes. With all the vigorous growth sprawling like ivy they are just perfect!

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