Vine Weevil Grubs in Raised Beds

Answered by Gavin Posted in Category Pest Control & Nature

Dear Harrod

I have a bit of a problem with what appears to be vine weevil grubs in my raised beds, I have adopted the role of main gardener (actually I am A Child Care  Practitioner,  a play worker ! ) here at the Bideford Bay Children’s Centre, in Bideford, North  Devon. Over the last 12 months we have had great success with various small crops of assorted plants;  I encourage the children to take an active part in digging/planting/playing/exploring/experimenting/growing  :- fruit/vegetables/flowers etc...

I have found the advert for  NEMASYS Vine Weevil Killer and it sounds like a good option in the removal of these pests, as it is a Children’s Centre, and children ranging from birth to 5 years and over use this service , my question is  :-  would this Nemasys Vine Weevil Killer be safe to use  in my garden area ?

I do not want to use chemicals, someone suggested the use of Nematodes and when I googled  Vine Weevils this Nemasys product was the first response ! Short of digging the pests up manually what would you advise ?

Waiting in anticipation for a solution

Sue Hawkins

Dear Sue

In answer to your question, yes 'Nemasys Vine Weevil Killer' would be a safe alternative to chemicals to use in your garden. The nematodes (Steinernema kraussei) supplied in this pack http://www.harrodhorticultural.com/nemasys-vine-weevil-killer-pid7624.html are harmless to us, and animals when used properly. These nematodes do occur naturally in most soils but in low numbers, so by applying many thousands in an infested area increases the chances of one coming into contact with the unwanted Vine Weevil larvae.  Follow the application and safety guidelines included and you can't go wrong. As with most bio-controls use sensibly around children i.e. don't let the children eat and / or drink them, put them in their ears or up noses!


I would apply the nematode solution after the children have gone home for the day or weekend, and so giving them plenty of time to soak into the soil overnight and get to work on the larvae undisturbed.
 
It sounds like a great job your doing with the children Sue and its great to get them interested in and exploring the garden at such a young age!


I hope you don't mind but I've taken the liberty to attach this shortcut http://www.buddinggardeners.co.uk/  Harrod Horticulturals 'Budding Gardeners', its a few pages on their website aimed at schools, children's centres and young gardeners alike. It contains some offers and seasonal fun things to do! Thought you might find it of some interest.
 
Many thanks for your query.
 
Regards,
Gavin   

 

Meet the Author: Gavin Hatt
Gavin Hatt

Believe it or not I began my career as a cobbler, however, after 11 years in the trade I decided to pursue my boyhood dream of studying insects (this I had already been doing for much of my life!). Whilst studying towards this career change I applied for a part-time post in the entomology department at one of the UK's leading plant biological science research institutes. I was fortunate enough to secure the post, to which I have now occupied for 12 years full-time.

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