Victoria Plum and a Green Gage

Answered by Jo Posted in Category Seeds, Plants & Trees

Dear Jo

I am hoping to buy a Victoria plum tree and a green gage, or Golden gage as you have it advertised, however, my question is this, we do not have room, neither do we wish to have a pair of plum trees in the garden, we do however have a long (well about 30foot) south facing wall with a bit of space into which we would like to train a fan of fruit trees and wonder if the trees you advertise would be suitable for such a job? if this is not the case (I see that the Victoria plum is on a vigorous root stock) could you please recommend a more suitable type?

 

Many Thanks..

 

Micky Tostevin  

Dear Mr Tostevin

Our Czar, Marjories Seedling  and Golden Gage plum trees are maiden trees perfect for training against a south facing wall.  They are grown on a moderately vigorous root stock which, with regular pruning and training will cover your wall in fruit.  These varieties are self-fertile.

Apple Tree
To give you an idea of what size they are supplied as, I have attached a photo of an apple tree delivered to the Kitchen Garden around a month ago.  It is 5 foot tall in its pot and the main stem has been pruned at approximately 4 feet. 

 

You will need to provide the tree with a strong system of training wires such as the GrippleTensioner System, and tie in the side shoots as they develop.  They will need pruning each year in Late Spring/ Early Summer.

 In order to train the trees you need to prune as per these RHS guidelines:

 ·        
During the first summer, prune in the third week of July when the young shoots have finished growing. Shorten new branches to 20cm (8in), cutting above a downward or outward-pointing bud. Also cut side branches back to a bud at 15cm (6in). Train and tie in the central leader to the stake

·        
In subsequent years during April, shorten the central leader by two-thirds. Repeat annually until the tree has reached 2.4m (8ft), after which, shorten the central leader to 2.5cm (1in) or less each May, to keep the tree at the same height

·        
Vertical shoots at the top competing with the central leader should be removed in late June.

 

I hope this is helpful for you.  Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance.

 

Kindest Regards

 

Jo

 

Jo Blackwell
Kitchen Gardener
Harrod Horticultural

Meet the Author: Jo Blackwell
Jo  Blackwell

Jo Blackwell is new on the Harrod Horticultural block and has recently taken over her post as Horticultural Advisor and Kitchen Gardener in Stephanie's Kitchen Garden. She caught the gardening bug when she bought her first home 18 years ago.  Her first greenhouse soon followed and she later gained an allotment, where she grows her own organic fruit and vegetables.

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