Fruit Pressing and Fruit Presses

Posted in Category Harvesting and Storage | by Jo | Comments (0)

Fruit pressing and fruit crushing is a process rich in history, with the production of apple juice and cider stretching back to Norman times. Things have moved on a bit since then, and today, pressing your own home-grown fruit could not be easier.

 

Easy to use fruit presses are a great way to start pressing your own fruit and are suitable for squeezing every last drop of juice from apples, pears and grapes and soft berries don't put up much resistance either.

You can use windfalls and blemished fruit to make your own sparkling fresh juice ideal for drinking, freezing, making syrups, ices and jellies or use it to make cider or wine.

Simply fill the fruit press cage with your crushed fruit and turn the handle to force the fresh, pure juice through the beech staves. Machine-washable straining bags, for straining the fruit juice as the fruit is pressed are available as an optional extra. 

It is possible to experiment with lots of different varieties of fruit to make your own unique flavoured juice and cordials.  The compacted fruit pulp created when pressing (known as pomace) need not be wasted either as it can be used on your compost heap or fed to chickens.

We have run some tests to find out just how efficient using a crusher prior to pressing your apples can be and the results were amazing! After cutting 30 apples into quarters and putting them straight in the press, we collected 350ml of juice, but running the same amount of quartered apples through a crusher first produced a whopping 1600ml of fresh juice - that is an increase of a staggering 357%!  

That's another reason we have introduced a Special Offer if you wish to buy both.  Buy a 12 Litre fruit press (GDN-226) and a fruit crusher (GDN-502) together (GDN-532) and it's just £315 - that's a saving of £20! 

Meet the Author: Jo Blackwell
Jo  Blackwell

Jo Blackwell is new on the Harrod Horticultural block and has recently taken over her post as Horticultural Advisor and Kitchen Gardener in Stephanie's Kitchen Garden. She caught the gardening bug when she bought her first home 18 years ago.  Her first greenhouse soon followed and she later gained an allotment, where she grows her own organic fruit and vegetables.

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